Category Archives: Miscellaneous Reports

Lets stick to facts and evidence: February 2016

A Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland report launched in February this year, estimated that wind was saving Ireland 2.3 % from total fuel imports per annum, of the €6.5 billion spent on fuel imports. This 2.3% saving did not include any fuel used in spinning reserve which is likely to have reduced that estimated saving to well below 2% and possibly even less than 1%.

Click here to read the full report

Negative effect of high voltage lines or wind turbines on property prices in the Netherlands

Government purchase of homes under high-voltage power cables

In 2017 central government will be launching a scheme to purchase homes located directly under high-voltage power lines. Eligible homeowners will be able to sell their homes to the government at a price determined by an independent valuer.

Click here to read the full article

Video: Health effects explained It isn’t just annoying noise

What’s interesting in the new documentary WIND RUSH is not the usual mantra about clean energy. What’s interesting is that the health effects of windfarms are recognized by health professionals, and explained very clearly. So we made an abridged version grouping the parts that help understand why there is a health problem.
Here it is below. It’s an eye-opener for most people.

Video Health effects explained – It isn’t just annoying noise EPAW – European Platform Against Windfarms

Acoustic Noise Associated with the MOD-1 Wind Turbine: Its Source Impact & Control

http://www.nrel.gov/docs/legosti/old/1166.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The True Cost of Energy: Windby Institute of Political Economy, Utah State University (July 2015)

This report explores the true cost of producing electricity from wind power. Rather than creating a new cost estimate, we analyze the findings of prominent cost studies by experts in the energy field. Each study includes different factors in its estimate of the cost of wind power. We break down each of these factors and explain the significance of each. These factors include: capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, capacity factor, transmission costs, baseload cycling, social and environmental costs, and the cost of government subsidies. Other factors are more difficult to quantify, but nevertheless add to the true cost of wind power. Such factors include: opportunity cost of taxpayer dollars, reduced reliability of the grid, and higher electricity prices. We conclude that, when estimating the true cost of wind power, all of these factors should be  included.

Click here to read the full report

 

Phone radiation: Scientists appeal to UN to protect against danger of wireless devices [Video]

VIDEO

Nearly 200 scientists submitted an appeal to the United Nations (UN) on Monday (11 May) requesting it to adopt guidelines to protect against the electromagnetic radiation that emit from cell phones, laptops, tablets and other wireless devices.

“They are damaging the living cells in our bodies and killing many of us prematurely,” said Martin Blank, a retired special lecturer in the effects of electromagnetic radiation on cells at Columbia University Medical Center.

“Cell towers are blanketing our neighbourhoods with radiation. It’s particularly frightening that radiation from our telecommunication and power line technology is damaging the DNA in our cells. It is clear to many biologists that this can account for the rising cancer rates.”

Click here to read the full article and watch the video

Cost Benefit Analysis obligations for Ireland’s Renewable Action Plan – Part Two by Pat Swords

What has been the benefit to date from our expenditure?

Ireland’s Renewable Energy Action Plan (NREAP) was prepared in 2010 without any proper assessment of costs and impacts. Table 10 of the NREAP provides us with the bottom line on electricity generation, namely by 2020 the installation of 4,094 MW of onshore wind and 555 MW of offshore wind. For wind energy installed in Ireland, where project costs are higher than elsewhere, approximately €2 million per MW is the installed cost for onshore installations and at least €3 million per MW for offshore installations. This then gives a total cost for installed wind energy of almost €10 billion.

Click here to read the full article

By Pat Swords BE CEng FIChemE CEnv MIEMA

Cost Benefit Analysis obligations for Ireland’s Renewable Action Plan – by Pat Swords

Ireland finally decides to do a Cost Benefit study for the renewable energy programme – Part One

By Pat Swords BE CEng FIChemE CEnv MIEMA

The Sunday Independent of the 12th April 2015, in an article entitled “Government yet to publish cost benefit analysis on wind energy”, clarified that “a spokeswoman from the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources said the Government believes it is necessary to take a broader look and will soon publish a report.

Click here to read the full article.

What has been the benefit to date from our expenditure – Part Two

By Pat Swords BE CEng FIChemE CEnv MIEMA

Ireland’s Renewable Energy Action Plan (NREAP) was prepared in 2010 without any proper assessment of costs and impacts. Table 10 of the NREAP provides us with the bottom line on electricity generation, namely by 2020 the installation of 4,094 MW of onshore wind and 555 MW of offshore wind. For wind energy installed in Ireland, where project costs are higher than elsewhere, approximately €2 million per MW is the installed cost for onshore installations and at least €3 million per MW for offshore installations. This then gives a total cost for installed wind energy of almost €10 billion.

Click here to read the full article

REPORT: Internoise – 2013 Innsbruck Austria, Noise Control for Quality of Life: 15-18 September 2013

Amplitude modulation (AM) sound, so called swish sound, is generally contained in wind turbine noise (WTN) and it causes serious annoyance in the areas around wind farms. Therefore, the methods to assess the characteristics of this kind of sound should be investigated in both viewpoints, physically and psycho-acoustically.

Click here to read the full article: Internoise – 2013 Innsbruck Austria (15-18 Sept 2013)

Report on WHO Night Noise Guidlines (NNGL) FOR EUROPE

The aim of this document is to present the conclusions of the World Health Organization (WHO) working group responsible for preparing guidelines for exposure to noise during sleep. This document can be seen as an extension of the WHO Guidelines for Community Noise (2000). The need for “health-based” guidelines originated in part from the European Union Directive 2002/49/EC relating to the assessment and management of environmental noise (commonly known as the Environmental Noise Directive and abbreviated as END) which will compel European Union Member States to produce noise maps and data about night exposure from mid- 2007. The work was made possible by a grant from the European Commission and contributions from the Swiss and German governments.

Although a number of countries do have legislation directed at controlling night noise exposure, there is little information on actual exposure and its subsequent effects on the population.

Estimates made in some countries of the number of people highly disturbed by noise during sleep (see Figure 1 for the Netherlands as an example) indicate that a substantial part of the population could be exposed to levels that might risk their health and wellbeing.

Click here to read the full report: 2007 Report on WHO Night Noise Guidelines for Europe